Soup

Korean Veggie Chili

Chili con Tempeh! Huh?

There is nothing like a really good bowl of something hot and filling on a chilly night. Yet sometimes, chili is just good on some chips with vegan cheese for nachos. Over some cornbread. Or some rice crackers. Rice noodles are great. Even over rice. Sorry, I gotta have my rice everyday.

 

Chili is one of those meals like soup that has the protein base with tomatoes in there somewhere. Different vegetables are also tossed in, as well as some kind of broth, beans, and spice choices. All combined and served with biscuits, cornbread, or even tortilla chips.

For something more hearty, I chose to use tempeh instead of just beans or tofu. Usually, I bake the tempeh to help add another depth of flavor. The browning or roasting aspect helps deepens the flavor; it builds a base, a foundation that sets the entire stage for the chili.

Beans add extra protein as well as fiber. I chose black beans for their heartiness as well as their slight sweetness. While adding corn for a hint of sweetness, as well as corn is a good source of vitamin C and fiber. Still, be careful not to eat too much corn, it’s high in sugar content and will blow you up – inflame you, cause you to appear bigger than you really are. Yet when you balance foods, it lessens the effects of a single food on it’s own. That is why when you eat things that are flour, sugar, fat and fried (all inflammatory), it creates a reaction within your body that has damaging effects when eaten regularly.

Korean Veggie Chili

Ingredients

  • 2 tablespoon water
  • 1 cup onions, diced
  • 1 cup red bell pepper, diced
  • 1 cup celery, thinly sliced
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1-inch piece ginger
  • 1 teaspoon sesame seeds, roasted and ground
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 tablespoon gochujang (red pepper paste)
  • 1 perilla or shiso leaf, chiffonade,
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce or tamari
  • 1 (15-ounce) can of black beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 (14.5-ounce) can of fire-roasted tomatoes, undrained
  • 1 cup fresh or frozen yellow or white corn
  • 2 cups water
  • 4 green onions, thinly sliced

Instructions

    Preparation
  1. Sauté 2 tablespoons water, onions, bell peppers, celery, garlic, and ginger in a medium-high heat pot until onions are translucent.
  2. Add ground sesame seeds, cinnamon, gochujang, and perlla or shiso leaf. Continue to sauté to intensify the flavors by caramelizing the onions, peppers, and gochujang for 3 minutes.
  3. Add black beans, undrained tomatoes, corn, and 2 cups water.
  4. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, simmer for 30 minutes. You can cook longer to intensify the flavor. If that is the case then simmer for 45 minutes total.
  5. Serve with blue corn chips, rice crackers, corn bread, biscuits, rice, or noodles.
http://www.beyondnfinity.com/korean-veggie-chili/

 

Vegan Mofo #31 Vegan Kimchi Jjigae (Kimchi Stew)

Bubble Bubble Red Hot and Delectable

 

 

It continues to be cold outside and the need to warm up. On this Halloween night something a bit spicy and devilish is in high order. Not only will it light you up, it will surprise you with  all the simple complexity within this dish.

 

 

In the past, this was one of those dishes that Koreans made and still do because they used the kimchi they made to use all through the winter. The dish generally consist of aged kimchi, kimchi liquid, pork, beef, or seafood, tofu, garlic, green onions, doenjang and gochujang (both optional). Because this is a vegan kimchi stew, we won’t be using pork, beef, or seafood.  It still will be very flavorful because of the kimchi itself.

You can make it thick or thin depending on whether you use onion and the type of tofu you use. Whatever you choose to add to your kimchi stew, whether thick or thin, this warming traditional dish will bring comfort and great health because of the beneficial bacterial in aged kimchi. As well as, every ingredient added to the dish adds even more benefits because each ingredient is fresh and made with top quality ingredients.

 

 

Kimchi Jigae or kimchi stew can be served in a communal manner if there is more than one person enjoying it. Serve with rice and banchan (side dishes). It can also be served in the pot it was cooked if using a stone or cast iron pot. Enjoy, party people!

 

Vegan Mofo #31 Vegan Kimchi Jjigae (Kimchi Stew)

Ingredients

  • 2 cups ripe kimchi, chopped in bite-size pieces
  • 1/2 cup onions. diced
  • 3/4 cup kimchi juice
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 green onions, one cut into 1 pieces and one thinly sliced
  • 3 1/2 cups water
  • 1 package of firm tofu, cut into small rectangles

Instructions

  1. Place all ingredients except the one green onion cut into 1 inch pieces and the other thinly sliced.
  2. Bring to a boil for 20 minutes.
  3. Add thinly sliced green onions and continue to boil for another 10 minutes. The long it cooks the more flavorful the stew gets.
  4. In the last 5 minutes of however long you choose to cook it add the 1 inch pieces of green onions.
  5. Serve with rice and banchan (side dishes).
http://www.beyondnfinity.com/vegan-kimchi-jjigae-kimchi-stew/

Vegan Mofo #30 Korean Cabbage Soup (Baechu Doenjangguk)

BRRR! Must Get Warm! Soup!

 

This is one of those times where soup will hit the spot. One of the best soups that many Koreans consume is cabbage soup. It’s such a quick simple soup. You can make it in less than thirty minutes, while a pot of rice is bubbling away.

Cabbage soup isn’t served in restaurants, it’s a tried and true Korean wife’s go to soup. A great favorite of Koreans everywhere. The liquid used in this soup is traditionally the rice water from during the rice cleaning process. That water has starch so it helps to thicken it without adding flour. Some wives use anchovies or beef broth as a base. Well, because this is a vegan soup, we will not be using neither one of those ingredients.

 

Instead just having cabbage, garlic, and doenjang, I chose to also add carrots , gochhujang and tofu to the mix. I don’t have childhood memories of Korean cabbage soup like most Koreans do because I didn’t grow up Korean. I grew up in Louisiana where we do have our own cabbage soup as well due to the Germans and the Cajuns. We eat just as much cabbage in Louisiana as the Koreans do. As a matter of fact a lot of the ingredients used in Korean cooking are very similar to ingredients used in Louisianian cooking. That will be for another day. For now, enjoy this wonderful mama’s homemade soup.

 

Vegan Mofo #30 Korean Cabbage Soup (Baechu Doenjangguk)

Ingredients

  • 1/2 medium napa cabbage, chopped
  • 2 carrots, diced
  • 4 tablespoons doenjang (soybean paste)
  • 1 teaspoon gochujang (red pepper paste)
  • 2 tablespoons brown rice flour
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 package of tofu, drained and cubed
  • 5 cups water (or 2 1/2 cup water + 2 1/2 cup vegetable broth)

Instructions

  1. Cut napa cabbage in half, save the other half. Cut into bite-size pieces.
  2. Wash and dice carrots. Mince garlic.
  3. Add cabbage, carrots, garlic, brown rice flour, doenjang, and gochujang to a pot.
  4. Sauté on medium-high until both paste blend into vegetables.
  5. Drain, rinse, and cube tofu. Add to the vegetable mixture along with the green onions. Stir.
  6. Add water or vegetable broth.
  7. Bring to a gentle boil and cook for 20 minutes.
  8. Serve.
http://www.beyondnfinity.com/korean-cabbage-soup-baechu-doenjangguk/

 

 

 

Vegan Mofo #27 Korean Cannellini Bean Soup W/Sea Vegetables

Here’s To A Warm Stormy Night In

Hurricane season is still going on here in Florida. Even though it isn’t going to hit us directly, we are still getting rainy weather from it. It’s in those nights that having a hot bowl of a hearty bean soup with fresh baked Italian bread or a piece of gluten-free bread would be nice.

 

Now this isn’t just a cannellini bean soup, this one has seaweed in it. I couldn’t resist. I love Asian ingredients – mostly Korean and Japanese. I tend to eat seaweed often. However, being acne prone it isn’t a great thing to do. Still, it’s difficult to resist. Seaweed is so versatile that it can be used in multiple ways. We know that kombu is often used in beans, yet I use nori, wakame, or even miyeok. Miyeok is used for birthday soup. Yum!

 

Usually when you make a bean soup, some kind of green leafy vegetable is used, like kale, mustard greens, or collard greens. Yet because I love seaweed, I thought it would work better and give it a salty aspect without having to add any as well as adding that extra special Asian feel. I also add a touch of gochujang. Always adding a little Korean to the dish in some way. I love Korean flavors. It’s a part of me. Which is strange considering I’m not Korean. Between the creaminess of the beans, the slight saltiness of the sea vegetables, and the kick from the gochujang; it’s pure heaven. Eating is Heaven. – Korean Proverb

 

Vegan Mofo #27 Cannellini Bean Soup W/Sea Vegetables

Ingredients

  • 1 cup of dried cannellini beans
  • 1/2 cup onion, diced
  • 2 garlic cloves. minced
  • 2 celery rib, thinly sliced
  • 1 sesame leaf (perilla or shiso leaf, if not then 1 tablspoon basil), chiffonade
  • 1 teaspoon gochujang (Korean Red pepper paste)
  • 1/4 cup wakame or nori, broken up
  • 5 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil

Instructions

  1. Pick through and wash beans.
  2. Add onions, garlic, celery, sesame leaf or basil, gochujang, sea vegetable, and water to a stock pot.
  3. Bring to a boil. Lower heat and simmer for 2 hours. Keep an eye out for if you need tot add any more liquid, if needed.
  4. Once beans are tender, add sesame oil.
  5. Stir and serve
http://www.beyondnfinity.com/cannellini-bean-soup-wsea-vegetables/

Vegan Mofo #16 “Jajun” Gumbo (Japanese Cajun Gumbo)

Quick simple and tasty!

There are times when I either I am short on time or I really do not feel like cooking. Let’s face it, most of us want convenience and great taste!

So, with that in mind, we arrived home after having been out all day. I was too tired to commence to the laborious job of prep before getting to actual cooking. The freezer had edamame and frozen shiitake mushrooms, while the refrigerator had the Cajun (and Korean) basics of celery, onions, and bell peppers. Along with the Japanese daikon radish and in the pantry came nori to round it all out. I grabbed some Nishiki rice and got it started. Dinner was only about 20 minutes – the time it takes to cook the rice.

Give it a try. YOU WILL LOVE IT

Vegan Mofo #16 “Jajun” Gumbo (Japanese Cajun Gumbo)

Ingredients

  • Cooked rice
  • 2 celery ribs, chopped
  • 1/2 cup onion, chopped
  • 1/2 cup bell pepper, chopped
  • 1 cup shiitake mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 cup edamame
  • 1/2 cup daikon radish, thinly sliced
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1/8 teaspoon oregano
  • 1/8 teaspoon thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon onion powder.
  • 4 cups water
  • 4 tablespoons brown (dark) miso
  • 1/2 sheet nori, cut into thin pieces

Instructions

    Rice
  1. Cook rice according to which type of rice you decide to use.
  2. Gumbo
  3. Water saute celery, onions, and bell peppers until onions are translucent.
  4. Add shiitake mushrooms, edamame, daikon radish and cayenne, black pepper, garlic, oregano, thyme, and onion powder. Cook until mushrooms brown slightly.
  5. Add water. Bring to a boil.
  6. Add miso. Cook for only a few minutes at a simmer.
  7. Place rice in a individual serving bowl. Top with a cup of the gumbo. Top with shredded nori.
  8. Serve.
http://www.beyondnfinity.com/jajun-gumbo-japanese-cajun-gumbo/

Vegan Mofo #9 Soybean Sprout Soup

Sick Day!!!

Actually sick day started Sunday afternoon and is still with me. I have a cold. How I got a cold is beyond me. I blame it on not eating kimchi everyday for a couple of weeks. I ran out and had to make more, however, at the same time, I didn’t eat any. Yet, when I’m stressed, I do wear myself down and illness can happen. With that being said, I only had enough enough to get something hot to drink. Hence, the soybean sprout soup.

 

The Koreans have been known to say this soup is great for hangovers.

Vegan Mofo #9 Soybean Sprout Soup

Yield: Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 pound of soybean sprouts
  • 1/2 cup onion, sliced thinly
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/2 teaspoon kelp granules
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce or tamari
  • 2 green onions, thinly sliced
  • 1 teaspoon sesame oil

Instructions

  1. Rinse soybean sprouts in water. Pick out bad sprouts, if any.
  2. Place sprouts in pot to saute.
  3. Add 1/2 cup of onions and continue to saute until onions caramelize slightly.
  4. Add garlic, soy sauce or tamari and 6 cups of water, making sure to scrap any bits from the bottom of the pot.
  5. Boil for 30 minutes.
  6. Add green onions and sesame oil.
  7. Boil 5 minutes.
  8. Serve.
http://www.beyondnfinity.com/soybean-sprout-soup/

 

Vegan Mofo #24 Black Bean Soup

 

You can not get any simpler than this on a cool night. You can have it as a soup or with rice and some plantains. I love them in a bowl piping hot with spoon in hand gently scooping up a taste of hearty goodness into my eager awaiting mouth.

 

Vegan Mofo #24 Black Bean Soup

Prep Time: 10 minutes

Cook Time: 30 minutes

Total Time: 40 minutes

Yield: Serves 4

Ingredients

  • 1 cup dried black beans, washed
  • 5 cups water
  • 1/2 cup onions, diced
  • 1/2 cup celery, chopped
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • 2 tablespoons tomato puree (or ketchup)

Instructions

  1. Sort and rinse beans.
  2. Place beans and water in a stock pot.
  3. After 45 minutes add onions, celery, garlic, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and tomato puree.
  4. Cook until beans are softened for another 45 minutes.
http://www.beyondnfinity.com/vegan-mofo-24-black-bean-soup/